MuNh na khulne par, voh aalam hai ke, dekha hi nahiN Zulf se badh-kar, naqab oos shoKH ke muNh par khula

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MuNh na khulne par

This is the 6th verse of Ghalib’s 14th Ghazal. Aug 15, 2015 @ 21:30 

MuNh na khulne par, voh aalam hai ke, dekha hi nahiN                                                                                                           Despite face is unexposed, her looks are out of this world                                                                                                                                                                        Zulf se badh-kar, naqab oos shoKH ke muNh par khula                                                                                                                 Veil looks more charming than locks, on her mischievous face                                                 

MunH=face  aalam= situation  dekha hi nahiN=never seen before Zulf =locks, hair, tresses  Naqab=vail   shoKH=mischievous, daring   muNh par khula= suits to face

Meaning: Poet wants to praise her beloved in every form and in every state. Generally, poet praises his beloved when her dark tresses cover her fair face. However, the poet sees her wearing a veil covering her whole face including her locks. He does not get disappointed but says that in veil she looks so beautiful that I have never experienced such excitement any time before. As if he is telling, that beauty does not exist in an object but it exists in mind of a lover. American soldiers serving in Saudi Arabia., Afghanistan, and other  Islamic law countries call Muslim women covered in black Burqa as BMO (Black moving Object) because these soldiers are a product of culture that embellish exposure and nudity; they can’t see beauty behind the veil.

Deeper spiritual meaning of verse: Allah’s face is covered with stars, planets, and Milky Way. Poet calls them tresses of God. Theses stars, planets, and Milky Way look so beautiful on face of God. However, when sky puts on veil of dark clouds, even those locks and curls of God disappear. To poet, this scene looks so beautiful that he says he has never seen such astounding beauty before (dekha hi nahiN). Though he is shrouded in million veils and mysteries, God’s beauty remains ever evident.

Finer aspects of this verse: In this verse poet has used word MuNh twice, which is not permitted in Urdu verses; but, the word MunH na khulna is an idiom; such duplication is permitted. Again, use of word dekha hi nahiN (never seen such) and Khula (Open) has created a freshness and a novelty.

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